Looking For a Short, Scary Story To Delight? Download These To Your Nook Or Kindle!

Though I enjoy writing in all genres, horror always holds a special place in my heart.  Below are a few short stories I have available for download on your Nook or Kindle.  Each is only ninety-nine cents.  Give them a look … if you dare!

ROADRAGE

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Remember that guy you flipped off in the car the other night? He’s in your house right now …

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“Did you just hear your device laugh at you?  Yes.  You did.  I’m the reason why.  Are you ready to meet me?  Download.  I dare you.  Just don’t do it … alone.”

Swingin the Clown: A Short Story by [Foley, Scott William ]

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Click “NOOK” to download

As usual, Sadie peeks out the back window before going to bed. This night, though, a clown sits upon their swings. Against her husband’s wishes, she confronts the stranger. She will wish she hadn’t.

Childhood Demons by [Foley, Scott William]

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In this disturbing short story, Henry Mansell must return to his boyhood home to handle some unfortunate business. Henry brings his wife and four-year-old son along, and when Henry reads his child a bedtime story in the bedroom from his youth, old demons arise.

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In one of Scott William Foley’s most disturbing tales, a runner happens across a smart phone along a mountain path. After realizing the phone is not secured, and after discovering why the phone lay near the mountain’s edge, the runner takes actions that will both appall and terrify you.

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Words Have Power – Choose Wisely

I learned early on in my teaching career that words have an incredible amount of power.  I could say the simplest thing and absolutely make a student’s day.  However, the opposite also rang true.  I could say something without thinking that had the ability to severely upset a student as well.

We are taught: “Sticks and stones may break my bones, but words can never hurt me.”  I don’t know about you, but my friends and I would use this as a mantra in grade school.  It served as almost a spell that warded off  insults.  We teach this to children because we know the cruelty that exists in childhood.  Kids say hurtful things to each other.  Sometimes on purpose with an intent to harm, but usually due to a lack of maturity.

As we get older and wiser, most of us learn to wield are words with caution.  We gain empathy.  We acquire the ability to consider the consequences of our words.  We understand that once a string of words is uttered, it can never be taken back.  We choose our words carefully.

Whether I like it or not, I am an authority figure when in my classroom.  I watch every single word I say because I know that my voice has the most power within those four walls.  My voice sets the tone of the room.  My words influence the actions of my students.  If I am calm, kind, encouraging, and articulate, my students’ mirror that.

During the first few years of my career, when I was barely past twenty-five, I enjoyed zinging my students.  We liked to banter with each other.  Typically, the insults were playful and harmless — I thought I was being funny.  However, sometimes a student would take it too far, and I would get upset.  I eventually realized that I had nothing to get upset about — the students were following my lead.  I set that tone.  My words dictated their actions.

In my early thirties, I stopped zinging kids.  I kept the jokes goofy and innocent — “dad jokes,” as my students call them.  Since then, I’ve found that the environment in my classroom has become far more relaxed, far more tolerant, and far more supportive.

Authority figures must be careful with their words.  I disagree with the notion that leaders have to “tell it like it is” because “like it is” is often a matter of perspective, and “like it is” is typically rooted in an agenda of some sort.  My “like it is” is not the same as your “like it is.”

There’s nothing wrong with considering others’ feelings.  There’s wisdom in predicting the potential ramifications of words.  There’s decency in showing restraint.

Choosing words that inform, inspire, and invigorate — that’s true leadership.

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(Did you enjoy this article?  Check out Scott William Foley’s short stories HERE!)

Thanks To Dayna Schickedanz and Barnes and Noble

I wanted to take a moment and thank Dayna Schickedanz and Barnes and Noble for the wonderful event they organized.  I had a fantastic time, met several new people, and thoroughly enjoyed myself.  Dayna and the employees at Barnes and Noble were extremely accommodating and  truly went above and beyond, especially in regards to promoting the experience.  As you can see in the pictures below, they gave it their all!

Thanks also to the friends and family who came out to support me.  Seeing your kind, familiar faces set my nervous heart at ease.  I especially appreciate my in-laws who stayed home with my youngest child who was getting over the croup.  This allowed my wife and other daughter to attend, which meant the world to me.

If you couldn’t make it, no worries.  I received so many well-wishes via social media and regrets — I didn’t expect anyone to personally explain why they couldn’t attend, but I still appreciated the gesture!  There will always be another event, and you will always be invited to attend … whether you like it or not!

To those of you reading Andropia for the first time, I hope it resonates with you.  I hope it speaks to you the way it spoke to me as it demanded to be written.  I hope it inspires you to never stop asking questions, to cherish your independence, to celebrate your identity, and to demand answers from those who would prefer you remain uninformed.

By the way, if you think the poster they made for the event is awesome, that makes two us.  I said as much, so they let me take it home.  Pretty cool, right?

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In Loving Memory Of Matt McClure

I won’t pretend Matt McClure and I were best friends.  We were friends, yes–absolutely.  Good friends.  But I don’t know anyone who knew Matt who didn’t consider him a good friend.  The sad fact is, I haven’t personally spoken to Matt in years beyond a few social media messages.  That’s certainly not the action of a best friend.

Part of me feels like I have no business even writing this.  I’m not family.  I’m not a best friend.  But I believe that no one is ever truly gone as long as that person remains in our memories, and I want to tell you about Matt because I want you to remember him.  I want you to know Matt McClure because I don’t want Matt to be gone.

I’m writing this in order to process my grief.  I’m writing this to help my friends and fellow people from Beardstown process their grief.  I’m writing this because writing is something I do well, and I want to honor Matt the only way I know how.

We’re not going to grant Matt sainthood.  He was not a saint, but he was, without question, one of the bravest people that I’ve ever known.

I’m told Matt exceeded his life expectancy by quite a bit–some have said he wasn’t expected to make it out of childhood.  If you knew Matt, you’re not surprised.  He exceeded at everything he did–especially when it came to living.

Matt was a brilliant person.  His wit could run circles around everyone else in the room.  And while he had every right to be pissed off at the world, he instead chose to make us smile with a quick joke, an ornery grin, and maybe even a magic trick or two.  His charisma could dazzle you.

Like I said, I’m not going to make Matt a saint, but I never once heard him complain about, well, much of anything.  Again, he had every right to complain as much as he wanted.  No one would hold it against him had he complained.  But he didn’t–not that I ever heard.  He met life head on.  He didn’t feel sorry for himself.  He participated in life, even defined life at times.  Can we all say the same?

Matt loved sports.  Matt loved people.  Matt loved life.  That’s why Matt lived as long as he did.  It’s a fact that Matt McClure lived more in his 40 years than most people will in a lifetime.

I found out today that Matt died.

I guess that’s probably obvious by now.

I don’t know any of the specifics.

At first I thought it could be a practical joke.  He once tricked everyone into believing he got married (maybe it was engaged–I can’t remember).  He announced it on Facebook.  I knew his sense of humor, and I knew it was April 1st, so I called malarkey.  Matt loved a good prank.

You’ll have to forgive me–this all seems to be a jumble of thoughts and emotions.  I wanted to do a better job of this.

Know that Matt McClure endured obstacles on a daily basis that we could never imagine.  Those physical actions that we take for granted proved enormous hardship to him.  Yet the man overcame it all.  He was given a weak, frail body, but that didn’t stop him.  His sheer intellect made him more than a match against life.  His radiant personality could not be contained by corporeal limitations.  His enthusiasm for active engagement with the world surrounding him could be equaled by none other.

Matt McClure was no saint, but I’ll be damned if he wasn’t a hero.

Never forget Matt McClure.  He earned your remembrance.

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Let’s Make This Book Reading About You

Our local Barnes and Noble invited me to conduct a book reading tomorrow, and I couldn’t be happier.  It’s truly an honor to be recognized by my community.

That being said, I want to make sure I satisfy everyone’s expectations tomorrow.  I’ve gotten so much positive feedback about the event that I honestly hope to leave everyone with a great feeling.

Typically, most book readings include a chapter reading (duh!) followed by a question and answer session.  Finally, the author sits at a table and (hopefully) signs a few books that people have decided to purchase.  That’s my plan as well because it seems to work.

However, I’d love to shake things up a bit.

I’ve given a few readings in my day, and I’ve also attended several by other authors.  It’s always a fine line.  Keep your reading and Q&A session too brief and you don’t capture people’s interest.  Go on for too long and you bore people to death, which prompts their immediate retreat.

As a teacher, I’m accustomed to reading facial expressions.  I can tell when I’ve got an engaged audience, and I know when I’m losing everyone.  Typically, I react accordingly.

That being said, I’d like to know what you would like to experience while attending tomorrow’s reading.  Is there anything in particular you would like to see or hear from an author?  Just like with my classroom lessons, I’m always looking for ways to spice things up.

So sound off!  Be heard!  I would very much appreciate your thoughts in the comment section below …

I can’t wait to see you tomorrow!  Remember, the event is Sunday, October 21st, at 2:00 p.m.  I’ll be there until 4:00 p.m.  Barnes and Noble will have plenty of copies available of my science fiction novel, Andropia.  See you soon!

 

 

 

Top 10 Reasons You Should Come See Me At Barnes and Noble On Sunday, October 21st at 2:00 p.m.

10.  There’s a very good chance I’ll accidentally wear the same outfit I’ve worn to other events — be sure to point it out to me

9.  Barnes and Noble has 50 copies of Andropia available, so there’s plenty for everyone

8.  You will be entertained one way or the other — I have been known to accidentally spit, knock over furniture, and have things fall out of my nose

7.  You’ll probably get a chance to meet my mom

6.  The seriously talented artist named Jude Landry created Andropia’s book cover — that’s reason enough to procure a copy

5.  Me … reading in public to a room full of people … yeah, what could go wrong?

4.  There’s a cafe on site with really good coffee

3.  There will be plenty of references to 1984, Anthem, The Giver, and Brave New World

2.  The good people at Barnes and Noble are super nice — two of them are even former students of mine!

1.  You’ll be a good friend supporting a lifelong passion

Honorable Mention

Andropia will entertain you, I promise

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Please Join Me For a Signing At Barnes and Noble This Sunday (Yes, It’s Really Happening!)

I’m so excited to announce that I’ll be at Barnes and Noble in Bloomington, IL, this Sunday from 2:00 to 4:00 p.m.  (Yes, it’s really happening this time!)

Join me for a discussion regarding my 2010 novel, Andropia, followed by a signing.  Books will be available for purchase.  In fact, if you’re going to have a copy signed, I suggest you buy it.  Barnes and Noble might not be too happy if we deface one of the books and then leave it on the table.

You may remember we had to cancel the event last time due to complications with my publisher.  However, my friend Jacob P. at Barnes and Noble sent me this picture as proof of the event’s legitimacy …

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It will be my honor to see you this Sunday at Barnes and Noble at 2:00 p.m. I hope you can make it!