You Come First: My Short Story Of the Week

YOU COME FIRST

 

You want to know who comes first? That’s right—you do.

It’s your right—your God-given right as an American citizen—to do whatever you think needs to be done. Who are they to tell you anything? You’re smart. You’ve been through a few things. You know what’s what, right?

These scientists, they’re changing their story every day. One day we’re supposed to wear a mask. The next day the mask doesn’t do anything. Then they’re back to telling us to wear masks again. Guess what? You’re perfectly healthy. You don’t have the virus, so you obviously can’t give it to anyone. You can’t give what you don’t have. There’s some real science.

Speaking of which, where do these grocery stores get off trying to force you to wear a mask? Are they the Gestapo? Who put them in charge? You go right into that store without your mask and just watch what they’ll do—nothing. Oh, they’ll talk. That’s all anyone does—talk, talk, talk. They’ll probably say something like “it’s for the safety of our workers,” but we all know that they shouldn’t have vulnerable people working there. Their employees’ frailty is supposed to keep you from eating? Not happening.

On the topic of food, can you believe they shut down the gyms? That’s a great strategy. There’s a virus going around, so let’s make sure people can’t exercise. Brilliant. Here’s some more science—exercise makes people healthy. The government has you sitting at home, eating like a pig, and won’t let you pump iron at the gym. They want you to get fat. They want you lazy. They want you at their mercy. That’s how they try to control you.

Furthermore, let’s talk about these people in charge. They think they can dictate where you can go, what you can buy, and who you can hang out with? Last you checked, you live in a democracy, and you most definitely did not vote for fascism. If you want to have people over, that is none of their business. Your friends are all grown, aren’t they? You can trust them to stay home if they’re not feeling well. You’re being treated like a child who’s been sent to your room, and you don’t like it. Not one bit.

In fact, they won’t even let you go to church. Seriously? There’s two things guiding the course of your life—God and the Constitution. Both of them want you in church. After all, you live in one nation under God. Are you really going to let some commie pinko tea party snowflake socialist get between you and your lord, Jesus Christ? No way. This is how they’ll eradicate Christianity from our schools, and you know it.

Schools. Can you believe this? It’s a fact that kids are barely getting sick at all, yet they shut down every school across the land. Just what are these teachers doing at home all day, anyway? Your kid hands in some papers a little late, just a few months, and those teachers take their sweet time grading. They’ve already got the whole summer off, and now an extra three months on top of that? Just to sit at home. You’re working your butt off, and they’re probably out on the golf course instead of grading papers the day they come in. You emailed your thoughts about that to your kid’s teachers, but they’re too cowardly to even respond.

Cowards. That’s the operative word. Everyone is scared of their own shadow. Not you, though. Just the other day, you were at the hardware store. You needed a new snow shovel—everyone with half a brain knows off-season is the time to buy. Some guy was taking too long looking at rakes, so you just stood right next to him and searched for the best price you could find—capitalism, baby. He thought he was tough, said something to you about keeping your distance. One cough in his direction proved what kind of courage he really had.

You’re good to go. You’ve got a big house with a giant yard and a great job you can perform from home. You earned everything you have, and if people are catching some bad luck during the Covid outbreak, that’s on them. They should have worked harder. The smart people know how to get things back on track, and it starts with the economy. When’s the last time the Covid spent a dollar?

You understand the Covid is flu. Technically, it’s not, but basically it is. Flu kills less than 1% of people who get it. The Covid kills less than 5%. You wish you were shocked the whole world shut down for less than 5%, but that’s today’s leaders for you—only worried about getting reelected. Let’s make everyone suffer for less than a handful of the population. The old, the weak, the sick—how much are those people contributing to society anyway?

You need to get this country up and running again by sacrificing whatever it takes.

America comes first, right after you.


Copyright © 2020 by Scott William Foley

This is a work of fiction. Names, characters, places, and incidents either are products of the author’s imagination or used fictitiously. Any resemblance to actual events or locales or persons, living or dead, is entirely coincidental.

All rights reserved. No part of this story may be used or reproduced by any means, graphic, electronic, or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, taping or by any information storage retrieval system without the written permission of the author except in the case of brief quotations embodied in critical reviews or articles.

Actual Reality: My Short Story Of the Week

ACTUAL REALITY

 

Captain David took cover behind a burning transport vehicle. His combat armor could easily withstand the flames, but the heat played havoc with his infrared display. Intelligence reported that his primary target remained hidden within the bunker seventy meters north of his position. Unfortunately, he couldn’t determine what kind of resistance awaited within the bunker.

“Command,” Captain David said into his communication link. “I have reached the location. About to infiltrate. Potential enemy combatants unknown.”

“Copy,” Command replied into his earpiece. “Proceed.”

“Yes, ma’am.”

Though no one shot at Captain David in particular, artillery flew in every direction as he powered across the open ground. His fellow soldiers had different objectives at other locations, and he could see them zigzagging every which way. Some were bursting into other bunkers, some were being cut in half on the battlefield, and some were simply kneeling in place. He couldn’t afford to stop moving, not if he wanted to succeed with his mission.

A light round bounced off his armor. He glanced in the general direction from where it came, but didn’t see anyone. Between the glare of the flames, the dark of night, the spasmodic shadows, and the general chaos, it was hard to discern much of anything other than his intended objective.

He squeezed off a series of rounds at the door frame ahead of him before shouldering his way through. As the door toppled, he next saw Goga Sedov–the Russian Razor. Sedov had left the Russian Armed Forces in order to become a mercenary. His methods were so good that terrorist cells were hiring him as their strategic officer. Because of the Russian Razor’s global threat level, Captain David had been ordered to eliminate him.

“Target in sight,” Captain David huffed into his microphone.

“Fire at will,” Command replied.

“Yes, ma’am.”

Captain David continued to move forward, closing the distance between them. Just as he began to trigger his artillery gauntlets, he realized that Sedov did not raise his own weapon.

Captain David glanced down as Sedov grew nearer and nearer only to realize that he held two children captive. They were set up as a human barricade. Because Sedov kept his guns trained on the kids, he appeared to count on Captain David halting.

Captain David never stopped moving. Instead, he leapt forward with his arms outstretched. His right hand pressed the fire button; his left hand knocked Sedov’s weapon away from the hostages.

The children burst into tears, but they were safe.

Sedov, now bisected, lay strewn upon the floor.

“Target mitigated,” Captain David said as he knelt to the children and wrapped his arms around them.

“It’s okay,” he said to them. “He can’t hurt you.”

Command replied: “Drone shows two civilians on the premises.”

“Affirmative, ma’am,” Captain David replied. “Diverted enemy fire away from them. Both are alive and well. Comforting in process.”

“Well done. 250 commendation points awarded for target elimination. 250 points awarded for valor.”

“Thank you, ma’am.”

As Captain David hefted the children from the ground, one in each arm, he requested: “Permission to escort civilians to refugee extraction point.”

“Granted,” Command replied. “Note: you are 750 points away from achieving Major.

“Thank you, ma’am.”

“Hold on,” Captain David said to the children. He then rushed out the door and raced across the battlefield. Explosions erupted all around Captain David as his legs pounded as fast as possible. The added weight of the children slowed him down more than expected. Furthermore, his primary weapons–the gauntlet guns–were rendered useless.

He needed to find cover, to rest a moment, and to strategize. Simply running across the combat zone would get them all killed.

An upended tank came into view. It would provide the protection he needed. However, when he reached the vehicle and rounded its corner, an enemy soldier lurked. The soldier had an M240 machine gun trained right on him. Captain David spun and dropped to his knees as the soldier opened fire. At first, the bullets ricocheted off his armor, but at that range it was only a matter of time before the ammunition pierced his gear.

Then, without warning, the gun’s thunderous discharge ended.

Captain David turned to see the enemy fall in a heap. He then looked around and observed a low-ranking ally, a Lance Corporal, running away. “75 pts.” flashed in bright blue above the Lance Corporal’s head for a few moments.

“My thanks …” Captain David said into his link before casting it to the fellow soldier.

“10 points awarded for gratitude,” Command informed. “And another 250 points for selflessness–you shielded those children from ordnance.”

“Davey!” a voice called out from above.

“Did you say something?” Command asked.

“Negative, ma’am,” Captain David replied. “Background noise. Disregard.”

“Davey! Can you hear me?”

Captain David looked in the direction of the refugee extraction point. If he could get the children there, he’d easily make Major. His visual display read 450 meters–over a quarter-mile. Such a trek seemed impossible, but it was well worth the risk.

“Hold on, kids,” Captain David said. “I’m going to get you out of here or die trying.”

“10 points awarded for reassurance.”

“Davey! Why aren’t you answering me?”

Captain David broke into a sprint. Explosions ignited all around him and sent debris banging against his visor. The children shielded their faces against his gauntlets, but he could see the chunks of metal and earth pelting their bodies.

“Hold on!” he yelled at them. “We’re going to make it!”

“Davey! It’s time for your dinner, honey. I made your favorite–fish sticks!”

Command inquired: “Who’s voice is that? Have you been compromised?”

Captain David continued running as he shouted, “No ma’am!”

“Davey!”

He’d covered 300 meters …

“Can you hear me, Davey? Are you still playing that silly game?”

“Your vitals suggest distraction, Captain David,” Command reported. “Do you need a break?”

“Negative, ma’am!” Captain David screamed. “I can do this!”

The whine of the missile appeared moments before the projectile itself.

“Game over,” Command informed. “Please try again.”

“Davey! Your food is getting cold. Get up here!”

David flung off his headset and screamed, “Mom, you fat witch–you just made me lose!”


Copyright © 2020 by Scott William Foley

This is a work of fiction. Names, characters, places, and incidents either are products of the author’s imagination or used fictitiously. Any resemblance to actual events or locales or persons, living or dead, is entirely coincidental to the story

All rights reserved. No part of this story may be used or reproduced by any means, graphic, electronic, or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, taping or by any information storage retrieval system without the written permission of the author except in the case of brief quotations embodied in critical reviews or articles.