Let’s Make This Book Reading About You

Our local Barnes and Noble invited me to conduct a book reading tomorrow, and I couldn’t be happier.  It’s truly an honor to be recognized by my community.

That being said, I want to make sure I satisfy everyone’s expectations tomorrow.  I’ve gotten so much positive feedback about the event that I honestly hope to leave everyone with a great feeling.

Typically, most book readings include a chapter reading (duh!) followed by a question and answer session.  Finally, the author sits at a table and (hopefully) signs a few books that people have decided to purchase.  That’s my plan as well because it seems to work.

However, I’d love to shake things up a bit.

I’ve given a few readings in my day, and I’ve also attended several by other authors.  It’s always a fine line.  Keep your reading and Q&A session too brief and you don’t capture people’s interest.  Go on for too long and you bore people to death, which prompts their immediate retreat.

As a teacher, I’m accustomed to reading facial expressions.  I can tell when I’ve got an engaged audience, and I know when I’m losing everyone.  Typically, I react accordingly.

That being said, I’d like to know what you would like to experience while attending tomorrow’s reading.  Is there anything in particular you would like to see or hear from an author?  Just like with my classroom lessons, I’m always looking for ways to spice things up.

So sound off!  Be heard!  I would very much appreciate your thoughts in the comment section below …

I can’t wait to see you tomorrow!  Remember, the event is Sunday, October 21st, at 2:00 p.m.  I’ll be there until 4:00 p.m.  Barnes and Noble will have plenty of copies available of my science fiction novel, Andropia.  See you soon!

 

 

 

Advertisements

Back In Touch With An Old Friend …

A few days ago I struggled to make a dent in a book that will remain unnamed.  As it happens, a student in my class raved about an old Stephen King book he’d just finished — Pet Sematary.

Like you, I know about his classic novel, Pet Sematary.  I seen bits and pieces of the old movie on TV throughout the years.  However, I’ve never actually read the thing.  If you’ve visited this site for awhile, you know I’m a Stephen King fan.  His nonfiction is always sublime.  I could read his thoughts on all manner of subjects day and night.  He’s one of the few contemporary writers who strikes me as both present and wise.

His fiction, though, it a little hit or miss with me.  I’m not an admirer of his work past the year 2000 (with the exception of his Dark Tower books).  Much of it strikes me as inflated and meandering.

The classics, though?  You know it.  For the most part, those babies are tight, fast, and going places.  Unfortunately, I haven’t read as many of his classic titles as I would like.

So anyway, as I listened to a student rave about Pet Sematary, I thought to myself, “Yeah, let’s do this!  It’s October; a trailer for the new film adaptation recently released; I’m not enjoying the book I’m currently reading — this is perfect timing!”

I literally put the book down that I was not digging and picked up Pet Sematary.

Ah, as soon as I started reading, it felt like I’d just reunited with an old friend.

I know the Pet Sematary years were a rough patch for King.  He’s very much on record with his addiction struggles.  I’ll be darned, though, if he wasn’t at his peak during those tumultuous days.  I’m in no way suggesting he should go back under the influence — absolutely not.  His style and voice during that time, though, were just so easy to get lost in, and remains so to this very day.  (That voice is still present in his nonfiction, by the way.)

Pet Sematary, like his other works from that era, connect with me in a way his current work does not.  I’m having an absolute ball reading it.  King’s appeal is obvious — there’s a reason he’s been a best selling author for almost fifty years!

It’s wonderful to pick up a book, start reading, and feel instant comfort.

Image result for stephen king

(Did you enjoy this article?  Check out Scott William Foley’s short stories HERE!)

How To Get Your Child To Read This Last Half Of Summer

We’re already over half-way through the summer, and a return to school is probably beginning to loom on both students’ and parents’ minds.  (Maybe even some teachers, too.  I’m just sayin.’)

If you’re a parent, maybe you’re feeling a little guilty because your child hasn’t done much summer reading so far.

No worries.  Better late than never, right?

You can start your student on a reading program this week!  Studies show that 20 minutes a day really is enough to keep them sharp.  Your local library undoubtedly has programs of some sort.  Most have probably been going on for a while at this point, but it could be a little extra incentive for your child.  In case the local programs have ended, you could always even find your own way to incentivize them!  Maybe if they read 20 minutes a day for seven straight days, you can take them to a movie.  You know, that kind of thing.  We all love prizes, don’t we?

Now, feel free to email me if you’d like to really dive deeply into the benefits of reading, but for the purpose of this article, I’m going to keep it pretty simple and commonsense.

First and foremost, though, let me say this: there is NO downside to summer reading.  Again: there is NO downside to summer reading.  It’s ALL positive.

Whew!  Glad to have that out of the way.

Okay, so, it’s a fact that summer loss can occur if a student does not continue to engage their brain with reading and math.  It makes sense, right?  The brain is like a muscle–if it doesn’t get exercise, it gets weak, flabby, and kind of useless.  Some studies have shown that those students who don’t read over the summer can spend the first few months of school trying to catch up to where they were at the end of the previous year!  Yikes!  So, if nothing else, reading in the summer keeps that brain in shape.

Furthermore, just like with exercise, the more a student reads, the stronger a reader they become.  Their vocabulary will continue to increase; their comprehension will grow; their creativity will progress; even their writing skills will improve.  After all, it was Stephen King who said–and I paraphrase–the best writers are always voracious readers.

I bet right now you are pretty on board with me, right?  But you’re also thinking, “Scott, buddy, I’m not much of a reader myself.  How in the world am I supposed to know what to give my kid to read?  I’m not a teacher!”  Luckily, the answer is pretty simple.  Let them read whatever it is that they want to read.  Easy, right?

Of course, use common sense.  I don’t know that I would allow a ten year old to read Fifty Shades of Grey.  The truth is, in my opinion, that it’s going to be hard enough to get most students to read in the summer.  If you try to dictate the material, well, you may be destined for disappointment.

For example, my oldest daughter loves graphic novels.  I pretty much let her grab whatever she wants from the children’s section of our local library.  I quickly flip through them, just to see if anything catches my eye.  However, I also get her a stack of chapter books that I think will interest her.  I don’t force those chapter books on her, but I do every once in a while suggest that she gives one a try.  More often than not, she’ll have a chapter book she’s working on while she tears through several graphic novels.

If your student loves sports, get books about those favorite teams or athletes.  If they love video games, get them books about the history of the industry, or how to enter the field as an adult.  If they love fashion, get them books about famous designers or books about how to break into that world.  I believe with all my heart that a student will read if you put a book in front of them that deals with their interests.  In the teaching biz, we call that “high interest reading material.”

Finally, you’re surely concerned about how to check to see if your student is actually reading.  (Some of us have mastered the fine art of sleeping with our eyes open, after all.)  Again, you don’t have to be a teacher to pull out some basic comprehension questions.  Here are five simple ones to get the ball rolling …

  1.  So, tell me, what was your book about?
  2. What did you like about the main character?
  3. Describe the most interesting part of the book for me, please.
  4. Why do you think I would enjoy this book?
  5. Talk to me about how this book reminded you of other books or movies.

Of course, you may need to press a bit.  If they didn’t like the book, ask them why.  In other words, try to avoid “yes” or “no” questions, because those don’t really facilitate any sort of analytical response.  You can’t gauge comprehension with a “yes” or a “no.”

Oops, one more thing: practice what you preach.  Read a book along their side.  You know this.  Kids can sniff out a rat faster than anyone.  If you tell them reading is important, but you’re not willing to do it yourself, they are going to think you’re full of hufflepuff.  What’s that?  You’re saying, “But, Scott, I don’t like to read!”  Remember all that stuff I said about high interest reading material?  Suck it up and apply it to yourself.  Heck, you might even enjoy it!

Okay, for real this time, I’m almost done.  If your child starts reading a book, and they don’t like it, let them put it down.  That book is not attached to a detonator that will blow up the house if left unfinished.  In the real world, people don’t finish books that they don’t like.  Most of us don’t expect to take a test or write a paper over our bedtime reading material.  Don’t freak the kid out about finishing every book they pick up–that’s the teacher’s job.  (I’m joking … mostly.)  Give them the freedom to pick up books and put them down as they please.  Let them choose their own material (within reason).  Let this experience be … <gasp!> … FUN!

Thanks for reading.  (Man, that pun was totally unintended, but I love it.  I’m keeping it in there.  That’s the benefit of not having an editor.)

pexels-photo-415061

(Did you enjoy this article?  Check out Scott William Foley’s latest book HERE!)

Green Lantern: Earth One by Hardman and Bechko – A Book Review

It made my day when I won this graphic novel by Gabriel Hardman and Corinna Bechko through Goodreads.  I’d been hearing good things about it, and even though I’m not a huge Green Lantern fan, I thought the idea of reworking him within the Earth One concept could be a wonderfully entertaining experience.

Even though Green Lantern has been rooted in science fiction for the last sixty years or so, word on the street said this book would strip away all of the fantasy elements the character carries and make it a true work of science fiction.

If you’re unfamiliar with the character, Hal Jordan is a test pilot who was chosen to replace a deceased member of the Green Lantern Corps, which is an intergalactic police force.  Each member wears a ring that will create hard light constructs of anything the wearer imagines.  However, Green Lanterns must recharge their ring every twenty-four hours with a battery that looks quite a bit like a … well, lantern.  That’s green.  This corps has hundreds if not thousands of members, and you can imagine all of the betrayals, deaths, love connections, uprisings, reshuffling of power, and so on that has occurred during the last several decades.

In this version, they broke with tradition and made Hal Jordan a rejected astronaut who currently works as a space prospector.  And … that’s about it.  Though the circumstances are slightly different, he still happens across the ring.  He eventually connects with other Green Lanterns.  He organizes and leads them.  This Jordan is more of an underdog, but I found the whole book very similar to what’s come before.  Even his costume is pretty much the same.

In my opinion, they did not take it nearly far enough.  They did not break away from his Silver Age roots in any meaningful way.  That’s generally been my issue with all of the Earth One books, though.  The idea is that these books would depict what these heroes would be like in today’s real world, and the answer is … pretty much the same.

I do want to commend Gabriel Hardman’s art, though.  He’s got an expert sense of anatomy and perspective, and his backgrounds are exquisite.  I also very much enjoyed Jordan Boyd’s colors.  His use of green light surrounded by the darkness of space felt fresh.  At times he seems to employ a dot matrix technique, which was also felt both nostalgic and original.

So while the book is well executed, I didn’t find it particularly inspired.  It wan’t the innovative science fiction extravaganza that I expected.

Image result for green lantern earth one book cover

(Did you enjoy this review?  Check out Scott William Foley’s short stories HERE!)

Pops by Michael Chabon – A Book Review

If you visit this site regularly, you probably know I’m a bit of a Michael Chabon fan.  (I met him once, you know.)  His latest book recently released, and I could not wait to read it.

Pops is a very slim collection of nonfiction essays.  I particularly enjoy Chabon’s nonfiction because he is unafraid.  He addresses topics that would scare most authors.  Specifically, he has no issues admitting that fatherhood, and manhood for that matter, is a bit of a work in progress for him.  Even though none of us have it figured out, he readily admits that fact.

Remember, Chabon is a world-renowned Pulitzer Prize winner.  He should have an ego the size of a mansion, but he doesn’t.  His humility is both refreshing and inspiring.

At just 127 pages, Pops succinctly delves into Chabon’s adventures in fatherhood.  If I’m not mistaken, each of his children serves as the focus of an essay.  The themes range from discovering the true nature of a child to seizing upon missed opportunities to trying to teach boys not to act like assholes.  There’s much more, of course, but the unifying factor throughout is Chabon admitting to his own mistakes and simply trying to do the best he can.

The book ends, interestingly enough, with Chabon writing an essay about his own father.  If you are a consistent reader of Chabon, you understand that this is well-covered ground.  He is not mean when it comes to his own father, yet he also isn’t sugarcoating anything.  It’s obvious that he loves his own dad, but it’s also apparent that he didn’t always like the man.

If find it fascinating that in a book about his own trials, tribulations, and triumphs as a father, he ends on a note that helps us to understand the events that forged the sort of father he would one day become.  Now, I trust Chabon completely.  I’ve been reading him since 2004, and I’ve never had reason to doubt his honor or sincerity.  However, it is worth noting that in all his recollections regarding his father, we’ve only had his unique perspective.  And now, in writing about himself as a father, we only have his point of view.  What would his own children say about these essays?  Will they find Chabon’s writing compatible with their own personal experiences?

Chabon is incredibly intelligent.  It would not surprise me at all if he were to have his children participate in a podcast or an interview or something to serve as a companion piece to this novel.  It simply struck me as an interesting thought.

As always, Chabon delivers beautiful prose describing his escapades in parenting.  If you love his writing, you’ll love this book.

 

Image result for pops by michael chabon

(Did you enjoy this review?  Check out Scott William Foley’s short stories HERE!)

Always On the Hunt For Something New To Read?

Are you always on the hunt for something new to read?  I publish short stories every week or two in a variety of genres.  Most of them are between five and ten pages long, and all of them are only ninety-nine cents on both the Nook and Kindle.

You never know what you’re going to get from me.  One story will be an inspirational tear-jerker, the next will keep you up at night in fear.  Some are hilarious, and others are so surreal that they don’t even make total sense to me.  I love to read in all genres–my writing reflects this preference.  I can’t be contained to one format, one style, or one genre.

If you’ll allow presumption on my part: I have certain authors that I adore.  Unfortunately, they are not exactly prolific.  They tend to write great novels … every three or four years.  If you decide you like my writing, you can always look forward to something new within a few weeks.

Visit my website’s homepage HERE for available titles with links to both Nook and Kindle downloads.

Thanks so much for your time.  I hope you’ll take joy in “discovering” me!

 

“Why We Won” – A Story About Football, Winning, and Brotherhood

Do you have football on the brain?  Do you enjoy short stories?  How do you feel about having your heartstrings pulled?  If you answered all of these questions in the affirmative, I hope you’ll check out my piece of flash fiction entitled “Why We Won.”  Just scroll down for links to Kindle and Nook and download for only ninety-nine cents!

WHYWEWONCOVER.jpg

Click “Kindle” To Download

Click “Nook” To Download

After five years of winning football state championships, a quarterback laces up for his last game. He and his team are brothers, and they know how much rides on each and every game. For them, winning is very much a matter of life or death.  (Family Saga/Sports)