Black Magick (Volume One) by Greg Rucka and Nicola Scott – A Book Review

Black Magick kept earning all sorts of praise so I finally got a copy of the first volume entitled Awakening.  The premise is that Rowan Black is a tough-as-nails detective by day and a witch by night.  Not the flying on the broom kind, but rather the sort who communes with nature and is able to tap into realities beyond normal human understanding.

Greg Rucka is an above average writer who particularly excels at crisp dialogue that often progresses a story line logically and engagingly.  He has created a cast of well-rounded characters that will surely become even more interesting as the series continues.

Nicola Scott is a phenomenal artist with a superb grip on anatomy and, like Rucka, knows how to pace her drawings to always move the story forward fluidly and fetchingly.  Her colors are also subtle yet they set the tone magnificently in more hues of grey than I thought possible.

But even with all that being said I can’t say Black Magick particularly captured my interest.  I’m not excited to read the next installment and really don’t find myself all that invested in Rowan Black’s ensuing tale.

That’s not to say you won’t like it, though.  If hard-nosed detective stories with a dash of the supernatural are your thing, you may very well enjoy it.  After all, Black Magick features the work of two of the best in the industry.

Image result for black magick volume one cover

 

Earth 2: The Dark Age by Tom Taylor and Nicola Scott

If you’re unfamiliar with the DC Universe, Earth 2 is a parallel Earth, one similar to our own in many respects, but different in many others.  DC has employed this parallel universe concept for decades, currently claiming that their are 52 parallel Earths within the DC multiverse.

Once upon a time, Earth 2 existed during WWII and the original incarnations of modern day heroes, such as The Flash and Green Lantern, were still very much active.  From time to time, these heroes would travel to Earth 1, for all intents and purposes, our contemporary Earth.  It proved an opportunity to keep long revered versions of characters around while still focusing on modern incarnations – and it offered some great plot possibilities.  As a kid, I loved it when Earth 2’s Justice Society of America would crossover with Earth 1’s Justice League of America.

A few years ago, DC brought the Earth 2 concept back, but instead of it existing during WWII, it is a world where Darkseid invaded and destroyed much of the planet.  Superman, Wonder Woman, and Batman died protecting that world, and now new heroes have emerged, heroes such as Jay Garrick and Alan Scott.  And though these were the original men to bear the mantles of The Flash and Green Lantern in the early 1940s, they have very much been updated and have little in common with their previous versions.  They are young, they are different, and they took some getting used to, but I have grown to appreciate them.

In this forth volume, The Dark Age, new series writer Tom Taylor pushes down on the accelerator and never lets up!  I picked this volume up at the library and meant to read a few pages before bed.  Before I knew it, I’d read the whole book (and stayed up later than intended).  It’s so good, I could not put it down.

For some reason, Superman, previously thought dead, is now in service to Darkseid and destroying anything and anyone getting in his way.  A new Batman has also arisen, more violent than his predecessor, but very much against the evils of Darkseid.  Dr. Fate, the Flash, Hawkgirl, and Sandman are still fighting hard, but now we’re introduced to a new Red Tornado, a queen of Atlantis, Jimmy Olson, and an alien that may turn the tide against the evil Superman.

The beautiful thing about Earth 2 is that it is not trapped in the endless cycle of its characters’ counterparts.  On Earth 2, anything goes, and Tom Taylor has taken full advantage of that fact.  Our heroes are pummeled throughout most of this book with nonstop action, yet Taylor still builds a captivating plot and introduces new mysteries.  Truly, this is one of the most exciting super hero books I’ve read in quite a while.

As always, Nicola Scott’s pencil’s are exquisite.  She uses clean lines, dynamic angles, and fluid pacing.  Furthermore, at one point Barry Kitson helps out with the pencils, and the transition is nearly seamless.  I’ve followed Kitson’s work since the mid-1990s, and he’s never been better!

One thing that drives me away from mainstream super hero comic books, especially those by DC or Marvel, is that no matter how much things change, they will always stay the same.  It’s a necessity to the serialized business.  Parallel universes give publishers and creators the chance to really cut loose and provide unpredictable stories.  Earth 2 is a prime example of how such stories can be successfully executed, and The Dark Age is my favorite installment to date.

 

 

Earth 2: The Tower Of Fate by James Robinson and Nicola Scott – A Book Review

There are two things I love in my graphic novels: world building and a true sense of danger.  Earth 2 has both in droves.

If you’re unfamiliar with the concept of Earth 2, it is an earth much like our own, but it’s just a little bit different.  In the “silver” age of comic books, Earth 2 remained in a perpetual World War 2 where the original versions of characters like The Flash and Green Lantern were still active.  That Earth 2 eventually merged with our “modern” earth in the mid-eighties and those characters aged appropriately (sort of), and so they were very old, active super heroes who referred to themselves by their original name predating Justice League of America, which was Justice Society of America.

DC Comics (sort of) rebooted their universe a few years ago, now calling itself The New 52.  The idea is that there are 52 worlds in the DC Universe, each with different versions of our well-known heroes. Of course, this provided the perfect opportunity for the Justice Society of America to go back to their original, young ages, but DC took it even a step further.

On this Earth 2, the world is set in modern times.  However, it has been widely defeated by Darkseid and his minions of Apokolips.  Superman, Wonder Woman, and Batman kept it from being completely overrun by Darkseid, but they died doing so.  Now new heroes have emerged: Hawkgirl, The Flash, and Green Lantern, but they are not the “golden age” versions of the characters, or really any version of the characters for which you’re familiar.  And while that’s initially jolting, it’s ultimately refreshing.

I say that because this is a dangerous world. Our three supreme heroes have already died.  No one is safe, danger lurks evermore from Apokolips, and because it’s not the “main” version of these characters, anything can happen.

And this is a true world.  James Robinson, the author, takes us to several locales throughout the planet and builds plot points at each.  This is not a Justice Society of America story, for there is no Justice Society of America yet and there may never be in this title. This is an Earth 2 story.

The Tower of Fate is really about introducing Dr. Fate.  The volume gives glimpses into Terry Sloan, Mr. Terrific, Hawkgirl’s origin, Steppenwolf’s recruitment of Fury, but those are just glimpses, morsels to be played out later.  Dr. Fate’s origin is the only plot that really reaches a conclusion within the book.

James Robinson, the author, earned my undying loyalty with his seminal run on Starman.  With that being said, his plots are strong. He’s taking this title in very interesting, unique places. However, that is not to say he is without fault.  At times his dialogue is flat-out corny and obviously serving to progress the story, not the characters.  But, let’s keep in mind this is only the second volume and the story’s groundwork is still being laid.

The art by Nicola Scott is astounding.  It’s beautiful.  It’s pure.  It’s amazing.  If you love this medium, you will love Nicola Scott – there’s no other way to put it.

Furthermore, I don’t know who designed Dr. Fate’s updated look, but it’s the coolest Dr. Fate yet.  He truly looks like an otherworldly figure, but a figure with roots in ancient Egypt nonetheless.  And though we got only but a brief look, I adore Mr. Miracle’s revamped uniform.  Like Dr. Fate, he’s always had a cool costume, but now it’s just a little more modern, a little more dangerous, a little more awesome.

Earth 2 is not perfect, but it’s a really enjoyable read.  It’s a blast to see familiar characters with fresh updates, the artwork is wonderful, and there is always a sense of urgency and peril.  This is a book about an entire world of characters, and I can’t wait to see where it goes.  You should pay Earth 2 a visit.