In Honor Of the Greatest Educator I Know

As Teacher Appreciation Week draws to a close, I wanted to take a moment and recognize the greatest educator I know.  Her name is Kristen Foley, and she happens to be my wife.

This is not favoritism, though.  If I only knew Kristen on a professional basis, my opinion of her teaching would not change.

I’ve known Kristen for seventeen years.  In that time, her commitment and dedication to teaching has not wavered–not once.  She has never compromised her standards, and she has not once taken the easy way out.

Kristen is quite demanding of her third grade students.  She expects the best that they can individually offer and she wants it on a daily basis.  She holds them accountable for both their academic performance and their personal actions.  However, I guarantee you that every single one of her students, year after year, comes out of her class both an improved student and person.

That’s not to say she’s a taskmaster, though.  I’m often amazed at how silly she’s willing to be in front of them.  It’s not unusual to find her dancing with them during brain breaks or to catch her singing like a rock star.  She is constantly striving to make her classes fun with innovative lessons, dramatic performances, cutting-edge technology, creative activities, and special keepsakes.

And while she asks for the best from her students and her school, she expects even more from herself.  Kristen demands 100% effort from herself all of the time.  She’s been that way from the day I met her, and she’ll be that way until the day she retires.

Once we put the kids to bed, she’s instantly back to work.  She is always grading papers, developing lesson plans, writing newsletters, returning emails–I don’t know anyone who puts in more time than she does.

As a fellow teacher, I sometimes suggest she ease off the accelerator a bit.  I’ve often worried that she’ll burn herself out.  But that’s the difference between Kristen and most other teachers–she literally cannot burn herself out on this.  She loves it.  She loves teaching.  She loves being an educator.  She loves her students.  She loves it in a way most of us cannot understand.

I’m thankful we still have teachers like Kristen Foley.  She is, without question, the best of the best.

Mrs. Foley Classroom

 

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Today, Something Embarrassing Happened To Me In Front Of My Entire Class

Statistically speaking, when you stand in front of people for eight hours a day, five days a week, during a career that could span as long as thirty-four years, something embarrassing is bound to occur every once in a while, right?

Well, my friends … read on.

Today I met my seniors in high school for the first time.  During 5th period, which is around eleven a.m., I stood before a group of students as they listened attentively.  While I ran through the syllabus with them, I suddenly felt a tickle in my nose–the right nostril, to be precise.

I ignored it and kept talking in the hopes that it would subside.

But then I felt something jar loose.

I realize now that the smart thing to do at that point would to simply excuse myself for a moment, blow my nose with my back to the class or out in the hall, and then return to addressing them as a group.

That would have been the smart thing.

Instead, I pressed on.

I’m not sure what I expected to happen, but some trace of flawed logic believed that an item breaking free from my nasal passage would not necessarily result in a total surrender to gravity.  I guess I thought–hoped–that whatever had emancipated itself would remain in place.

Before I knew it, I felt a string of cold, wet … gunk … hanging from my nostril.

Not dropping from my nostril–HANGING FROM MY NOSTRIL.

Fight or flight kicked in.

I could run out of the room, or I could take action.

I chose action.

Did I have time to grab a tissue?  That would mean that the detritus would remain in place as I traversed the span of the room.  No, that would not do.  The debris must be dealt with immediately.  I could not risk providing a picture opportunity.  This moment would not live on in social media infamy.

With a whip of the hand, a strategic swipe of the forefinger, the goo got wiped away.

It did not dissipate, nor did it fling to the floor.  No, it clung to my finger, still easily discernible to the observant eye.

Operating on pure instinct, I moved to the tissue box, yanked out a tissue, and swiped the miserable muck off my person before jettisoning it into the garbage.

And then … I faced the class.

Once again … fight or flight time.

Within a span of five seconds, I said the following …

“Oh, my gosh, I’m so sorry!”

“Well, that was gross.”

“It just fell out, out of nowhere!”

“Yuck, it was gray.  Probably gray matter.  My brains are falling out!”

“If I’m not here tomorrow, you’ll know why.”

“At least you’ve all got a story to tell now.”

“Let’s just move on and pretend this never happened.”

So, there you have it.  Is that the most embarrassing thing that’s ever happened to me in front of an entire class?  So far, probably.  Hey, I made it sixteen years teaching before something abruptly and uncontrollably left my body.  That’s a pretty good run, right?

Man.

I hope that’s as bad at it gets.

 

Emoticon, Face, Smiley, Unwell, Unhappy, Embarrassing

(Did you enjoy this article?  Check out Scott William Foley’s latest book HERE!)

The Edutainer

There’s a term that has come into vogue lately that I find a little troubling–“The Edutainer.”

If you’re unfamiliar with this word, it’s combining “educator” with “entertainer.”  The idea is that a teacher performs daily for their classes in such a way that the students are entertained.

Not just engaged, but actually entertained as though they were watching a show.

Yes, on the surface that sounds wonderful, but I think most of us realize that there are very few people from any walk of life who can perform daily for eight hours a day in such a way that children/teenagers are both learning and laughing nonstop.

Furthermore, I think it’s very unfair to make teachers feel as though they are somehow less effective if they are not constantly entertaining their students.

I’ve been teaching long enough to know that certain “buzzwords” come and go.  Usually these buzzwords are developed by a person or company looking to make a buck.  I’ve heard of professional development, workshops, and even college courses pushing “edutainment.”

Now, if we’re being honest, I’ve been told that I’m an “edutainer.”  I’ve never quite figured out if that’s meant as a compliment or an accusation, by the way.  However, I know myself well enough to realize that my “edutainment” is just part of my personality.  When I’m in front of a group of kids, I get silly.  I can’t help it.  I like to keep things light.  I like to joke around.  I like to make people smile.

This is fine for me, but I would never dream of forcing other people to adopt this methodology if it’s not part of their personality.  At the end of the day, teachers must teach in a manner that makes them comfortable.  Obviously, no matter what, lessons must be engaging, but to ask a teacher to put on a “show” is not really fair, especially if that’s not a component of their persona.  I’ve personally had some really funny teachers in my life, but I’ve also had very serious teachers as well.  I learned a great deal from both because–most importantly–they were effective teachers.  Let’s not lose sight of what were really trying to achieve.  First and foremost, our students should be learning.

It is worth noting, however, that teachers can still incorporate “edutainment” in their classroom even if they are not specifically the “edutainer.”  There are plenty of educational websites and learning programs that deliver fun, entertaining content to supplement a teacher’s lessons.  I would encourage teachers to look into those things because I also believe the days of asking students to listen to lecture while taking notes is over.  Our students are accustomed to bouncing from one thing to the next, and I would venture that the teachers operate like that in their personal lives as well.  There’s an old saying that teachers should switch up their activities during a lesson every fifteen minutes.  “Edutainment” programs would be one helpful way to achieve this.

At the end of the day, I would encourage teachers to accept who they are as people.  If a teacher is not an “edutainer,” that’s totally okay.  No teacher should ever feel less effective if they are not comfortable with a style that contradicts their persona.  As long as students are treated respectfully, with kindness, and provided consistently engaging lessons, I think the kids will be just fine.

Clown, Crazy, Happy, Funny, Cartoon

(Did you enjoy this article?  Check out Scott William Foley’s latest book HERE!)