Thanks To Dayna Schickedanz and Barnes and Noble

I wanted to take a moment and thank Dayna Schickedanz and Barnes and Noble for the wonderful event they organized.  I had a fantastic time, met several new people, and thoroughly enjoyed myself.  Dayna and the employees at Barnes and Noble were extremely accommodating and  truly went above and beyond, especially in regards to promoting the experience.  As you can see in the pictures below, they gave it their all!

Thanks also to the friends and family who came out to support me.  Seeing your kind, familiar faces set my nervous heart at ease.  I especially appreciate my in-laws who stayed home with my youngest child who was getting over the croup.  This allowed my wife and other daughter to attend, which meant the world to me.

If you couldn’t make it, no worries.  I received so many well-wishes via social media and regrets — I didn’t expect anyone to personally explain why they couldn’t attend, but I still appreciated the gesture!  There will always be another event, and you will always be invited to attend … whether you like it or not!

To those of you reading Andropia for the first time, I hope it resonates with you.  I hope it speaks to you the way it spoke to me as it demanded to be written.  I hope it inspires you to never stop asking questions, to cherish your independence, to celebrate your identity, and to demand answers from those who would prefer you remain uninformed.

By the way, if you think the poster they made for the event is awesome, that makes two us.  I said as much, so they let me take it home.  Pretty cool, right?

BN Signing 10212018 Promotion 1

BN Signing 12212018 Promotion 2.jpg

BN Signing 10212018 Reading Andropia.jpg

BN Signing 10212018 Book Signing.jpg

BN Signing 10212018 By Poster.jpg

 

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My Newest Book – Andropia – Arrives Soon!

I’m ecstatic to announce that my latest book, Andropia, is due to arrive in just a few short weeks!

Andropia is the world’s last city, a utopia for its citizens known as Andropians.  They exist to please the Maker, he who created them in his floating Citadel.  Andropians cheerfully question nothing as they go about unnecessarily purifying air, cleaning water, and raising livestock.

When Isaac arrives from the Citadel, his many questions lead other Andropians to compare him to the deviant Amelia.  Soon Amelia and Isaac’s paths cross, and she persuades him to help rescue their people.  For she long ago discovered a suspected harbinger of destruction, an object that could mean the end of life as they know it.

Isaac and Amelia invade the Citadel and confront the Maker, but nothing could have prepared them for what they learn and their final fates.

To get your signed copy of Andropia, simply follow the link:

https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=KYL4N7D8D4XHG

or send $13.95 to:

Scott William Foley
P.O. Box 174
Normal, IL  61761

The shipping is free, and because the book won’t hit the market for a few more weeks, please allow up to six weeks for delivery.  As soon as they are available, I’ll mail you your copy without hesitation.

If you’d like to read the first few chapters, click on this: Andropia Sample Chapters!

Come See Me At Hometown Comics On Saturday, May 2nd

I’m so pleased to announce that Hometown Comics in Edwardsville, IL, has invited me to be among their special guests during Free Comic Book Day on Saturday, May 2nd!

Free Comic Book Day is a nationwide promotional event put together by the comic book publishers and shops to try to reach new readers.  Many of the publishers submit exclusive comic books for this specific day and they are totally free.  All you have to do is come in and grab one.  Some of the comic books are geared towards adults (not pornographic, just mature themes), but many of them are also aimed at young children.  For a list of what comic books will be available that day, visit this link:  http://www.freecomicbookday.com/comics.asp

Hometown Comics is in downtown Edwardsville, IL, at 110 E. Vandalia Street.  They plan to have local artists drawing sketches for children, a custom motorcycle designed to look like Ghost Rider’s, and are inviting people to show up dressed as their favorite character.  Call Doug at 618-655-0707 for more information and visit their MySpace page here:  http://www.myspace.com/hometowncomics

The shop opens at 10:00 A.M. and I’ll be there at that time.  All three of my books will be for sale and I’m currently trying to decide which of my superhero shirts I’ll wear that day.  I hope you’ll come out to Hometown Comics on Saturday, May 2nd, grab a free comic for you or your child, take part in the festivities, and say hi.

If you have any questions, email me at ScottWilliamFoley@gmail.com.

Author Tim O’Brien Is Coming To Illinois State University and Illinois Wesleyan University

Novelist Tim O’Brien will visit Bloomington-Normal, Illinois, for the 7th Annual Ames/Milner Visiting Author Program on October 23, 2008.
 
At 2:00 p.m. at the Illinois Wesleyan University Hanson Student Center, Mr. O’Brien will participate in a question and answer session.

At 7:00 p.m. in Braden Auditorium at Illinois State University, Mr. O’Brien will address the community with “An Evening with Tim O’Brien.”  A book signing will follow the event.
 
All events are free and open to the public.

Mr. O’Brien is a Vietnam veteran and calls upon that experience for many of his works.  He attended Harvard University and once worked for the Washington Post.

His books include:
If I Die in a Combat Zone, Box Me Up and Ship Me Home (1973)
Northern Lights (1975)
Going After Cacciato (1978)
The Nuclear Age (1985)
The Things They Carried (1990)
In the Lake of the Woods (1994)
Tomcat in Love (1998)
July, July (2002)

For additional information contact Toni Tucker ttucker@ilstu.edu or (309) 438-7402.

“Think Higher. Feel Deeper.” – Elie Wiesel At Illinois State University

On October 7th I had the good fortune to spend the better part of the day and night learning from Elie Wiesel, acclaimed humanitarian and author of Night (among many other works).

I first attended his question and answer session at Milner Library from 3:30 to 4:30.  It was soon obvious that Mr. Wiesel, even at his advanced age, was by far the smartest person in the room.  He answered questions for a solid hour, and he did so gracefully, articulately, and honestly.  While his voice was frail, his words were powerful, and I think everyone in the room was deeply moved by his frank responses to a series of thoughtful questions.  Some paraphrased highlights among those answers include the fact that he would not comment on who he endorsed for the next presidency, but he added that he found American politics getting uglier with each passing decade-particularly the last thirty years.  He said he does not forgive Nazi Germany for the Holocaust, but he would always forgive an individual should they apologize.  He said he had more sympathy for the children of killers than anyone else, because they often carry the burden of their parents’ guilt.  He said that he did not think the world would ever learn to be peaceful, because if it hadn’t learned from the atrocities of the Holocaust, what could possibly make a difference now?  However, he amended that statement by saying we must never lose hope, and we must always strive to make a difference for the children in the world.  He emphasized the need to protect and care for humanity’s children, and then quoted Scripture about never standing idly by.

I’ve done a few question and answer sessions myself in regards to my writing, and I can tell you firsthand it is both exhausting and stressful.  You must keep on your toes with your impromptu responses and hope you don’t come off sounding like an imbecile.  Mr. Wiesel’s probably answered the same general questions a thousand times, but all of his replies sounded genuine, original, and produced specifically for that person asking the question.  He never appeared nervous, and he truly had a calming presence that I found quite unique.    

At the end of the question and answer session, they asked that we all remain in place while he was escorted out of the room by security.  I would learn later that evening by his candor that many in the world find his honesty threatening and would seek to harm him.

Consequently, I was amazed by how many people showed up at Milner Library for his question and answer session; however, that wonderful turnout was nothing compared to his presentation later that evening at the Bone Student Center …

We arrived at Braden Auditorium in the Bone Student Center around 6:15 p.m. for his 7:00 p.m. address.  The center teemed and we were lucky to find seats in the very last row of the main level.  As we sat for forty-five minutes, people kept flooding in, and my heart burst with pride in the people of Central Illinois.  So many showed up to listen to this man, there literally weren’t enough seats in the mammoth auditorium which can hold almost 3500 people.  Can you imagine?  On a rainy Tuesday night?  My faith in people’s respect for intellectualism quadrupled that night.

When Mr. Wiesel appeared on stage, he sat at a simple table with a white cloth covering it and a single microphone.  His security flanked him on either side in the shadows, for he had a single spotlight shining down upon him.  The auditorium remained well-lit, so everywhere you looked you saw thousands of people hanging upon his every word.

This time Mr. Wiesel offered a prepared talk, though he sprinkled some tidbits from his afternoon at Milner Library into it.  He spoke again about our responsibility to the children, that we must never stand idly by, and he reminded us that genocide still occurs in places like Myanmar, Cambodia, Bosnia, and Darfur.  He referenced Scripture often, focusing upon the story of Cain and Abel, and the ability brothers have to kill one another.  Totally humble, he spoke of meeting with world leaders, moderating peace talks, and addressing presidents.  He denounced racism, heavily criticized the leader of Iran, and spoke against fanatics who use religion as their excuse to propagate hatred and murder.  He reminded us that each and every person has the responsibility to help our fellow man, and as long as anyone in this world dies from hunger, we should all feel intense shame.  In the end, he left us with such simple and inspiring words-“Think higher.  Feel deeper.”

They announced Mr. Wiesel would sign books for half an hour, but with the thousands of people there, we knew it would be futile to even try.  I regretted that I wouldn’t get a copy of Night signed for my three-month-old daughter-one day to be a gift-but I understood that a man of his age who speaks so openly against those who think nothing of killing may not want to interact with the general public at a relatively unsecure location for too long.  In the end, even though I didn’t get a book signed to her, I can one day tell Emma all about the day Elie Wiesel came to Central Illinois, and that’s something to which I greatly look forward.

Again, words cannot describe how proud I am of the people who came out that night to see Mr. Wiesel.  When I think about one man who’s made such a difference in this world of ours encouraging each and every person in that room to resist the urge to stand idly by, it really fills my heart with joy. 

Learning from Mr. Wiesel was something I’ll forever cherish, and I thank him for coming to Illinois State University.  I also believe Toni Tucker of Illinois State University’s Milner Library deserves tremendous credit for bringing him to us as well.  It had to have been tremendously stressful for her, but she pulled it off fantastically.  Well done, Toni!

It has not yet been even twenty-four hours since listening to Mr. Wiesel, so my brain is still bustling with excitement.  If there’s anything you’d like to know-anything I may have omitted-please don’t hesitate to ask a question in the comments or email me at scottwilliamfoley@gmail.com.

For local newspaper coverage, follow the links:
Pantagraph
Daily Vidette

Thanks To Toni Tucker And Milner Library

Yesterday I took part in a panel discussion on publishing at Milner Library.  The other authors were Patti Lacy and Adam Decker, and, judging from all the notes I saw the audience taking, the three of us offered some diverse and informative ideas and experiences about the world of print.  I know I learned a few new things from my fellow authors as well!

I wanted to specifically thank Toni Tucker and her staff at Milner Library for inviting me to take part in such a fun discussion and for working so hard to promote a very well-organized event.

Here are some links to get to know Milner, Patti, and Adam:

Milner Library

Patti Lacy

Adam Decker