Ready To See a New Doctor?

If you’re not a fan of Doctor Who, I get it.  I totally get it.  The only reason I started watching Doctor Who a few years ago is because I knew nothing about it and I felt like such ignorance really diminished my geek cred.  Seriously.  I had no idea what the word “TARDIS” even meant.

At first, truthfully, I considered the show idiotic.  I began with the Ninth Doctor, as my nerdy friends told me to do.  The plots were, for the most part, campy, the special effects were silly, and the characters were ludicrous.

But then a strange thing happened.  I slowly but surely fell in love with it all.  I embraced the goofiness, the hyperbole, and the entire zany mythology.  I finally recognized the brilliance of it just as thousands of others had during the last fifty years.

My point is, if you’ve ever been curious about the Doctor (never call the actual character Doctor Who), there’s no better time to jump on board than tomorrow, October 7th.

For the fist time since the character’s arrival in 1962, a woman will play the Doctor.

If you’re unaware of the premise, and I promise not to bog you down too much in the details, the Doctor is an alien who can travel through time and space.  The Doctor is usually a champion for life, justice, and mercy.  Because of the character’s species, the Doctor never dies, but instead regenerates into a new body.  Therefore, even though at least fourteen people have played the Doctor (yes, nerds, I’m counting John Hurt’s War Doctor), the character has theoretically been the same consciousness.

But tomorrow, Jodie Whittaker’s Thirteenth Doctor will change everything … and I can’t wait.

Sure, since it’s return to television in 2005, Doctor Who has tried to keep things fresh.  I can’t say I ever got bored watching the series!  David Tennant played a lovable hero, Matt Smith a charismatic mad man, and Peter Capaldi a cranky favorite uncle, but no one will completely alter the character’s trajectory like Jodie Whittaker by virtue of her gender alone.

As a writer, I would love this opportunity!  This new Doctor can do something the character hasn’t been able to do since 1962 — convey a female perspective on the ensuing adventures.  There are virtually limitless storytelling openings now.

As a fan, I’m equally excited.  I love all of the actors who played the Doctor, but with Whittaker I know every episode to come is going to be unlike any other.

My desire is that they don’t have Whittaker playing a man in a woman’s body — I sincerely hope she plays the Doctor as an actual woman and everything that transformation encapsulates.

Best of all?  For the first time, I’m planning to let my ten and six-year-old daughters watch Doctor Who with me.  Though the show is all in good fun, I worried in the past that the aliens and monsters might give them nightmares.  This is a historic evolution to the character, though, and I want them to take part in it from Day One.  I love the fact that my daughters now have a Doctor of their own, a Jedi of their own, and super heroes of their own.  They get to take joy in the very same concepts that have delighted me during my life, but in a way that speaks uniquely to them.

So like I said, if you’ve ever been curious about the Doctor, tomorrow is the time to make an appointment.

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(Did you enjoy this article?  Check out Scott William Foley’s short stories HERE!)

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The 12th DAUSTER

I love Doctor Who, though I’m a relatively recent convert.  I think I became a fan about two years ago.  I’m very much enjoying Peter Capaldi’s take since taking over the role of The Doctor.

It was around 2004 that I discovered one of my favorite authors, Paul Auster, and I’ve read nearly every one of his books since.  Of late, Paul Auster has been appearing in my various Facebook and Twitter feeds for this video/article.

And then it hit me – Paul Auster and Peter Capaldi look very much alike.  I created the below image very much in admiration of the two men.

12 DOAUSTER

 

My Initial Impression Of the Twelfth Doctor

Last night Peter Capaldi properly debuted as the Twelfth Doctor.  I happen to really like what I’ve previously seen of Capaldi, both as an actor and as an actor being interviewed (I can’t claim to actually know him as a person).  I must admit that I rooted for Capaldi to have a fantastic first appearance.

But did I like him as the Doctor?  I honestly don’t know yet.  I imagine this is what a lot of people are saying, because the first episode is just that – the first episode.  I wasn’t sold on the Ninth Doctor or the Tenth Doctor when they first appeared.  The Eleventh Doctor won me over immediately, but how could he not when he was so kind to little Amelia Pond?  Most Doctors need a little time to bounce back from the regeneration, and most actors need a little time to really sort out their interpretation of the icon.  The good news is that I’ve ended up loving all the Doctors, and I have no doubt I’ll love Capaldi as well.

But, frankly, I don’t love him yet.

There’s a few things working against him, most of which are beyond his control.  For example, like most fans I worked myself into an anticipatory frenzy awaiting his debut – and it was a long wait.  Could his debut ever live up to that kind of prolonged excitement?  Furthermore, I didn’t really enjoy the actual story of his debut episode.  Let’s be honest – most Doctor Who episodes aren’t very complete from a pure story standpoint.  Oftentimes the actors outshine the story, so no one notices, and that’s totally find with me.  I’m there for the Doctor.  (Of course there are exceptions, and there have been some brilliantly written episodes.  I’m speaking in generalities.)  Lastly, I don’t think he got enough Doctor moments.  In fact, the episode seemed to focus on Clara more than anything.  I understand this approach – giving the fans an anchor for which they are familiar makes sense.

But, even with all that being said, the Twelfth Doctor had a few standout moments.  For example, describing his frown to the homeless man really proved a pleasing moment.  The final scene on the streets of Glasgow also proved effective and gave Capaldi a chance to show his range.

Speaking of which, I saw some wonderful acting from Capaldi, and I am positive he will probably be the best “actor” of the recent group, but I’m not yet certain he has that intangible charisma that made Ten and Eleven so dynamic.

But that’s okay.  Most of Ten and Eleven’s magnetism came from funny, sweet moments, or outright silliness, and that does not suit Twelve.  It’s already obvious that Capladi will not don goofy hats or sneakers.

Where will Capaldi take Twelve?  I don’t know, but I am of course along for the ride.  I’m sure by the year’s end I will be raving about Twelve, but as of right now, I’m just not totally enraptured.