Flipping Out: A Panel Discussion

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Today, Something Embarrassing Happened To Me In Front Of My Entire Class

Statistically speaking, when you stand in front of people for eight hours a day, five days a week, during a career that could span as long as thirty-four years, something embarrassing is bound to occur every once in a while, right?

Well, my friends … read on.

Today I met my seniors in high school for the first time.  During 5th period, which is around eleven a.m., I stood before a group of students as they listened attentively.  While I ran through the syllabus with them, I suddenly felt a tickle in my nose–the right nostril, to be precise.

I ignored it and kept talking in the hopes that it would subside.

But then I felt something jar loose.

I realize now that the smart thing to do at that point would to simply excuse myself for a moment, blow my nose with my back to the class or out in the hall, and then return to addressing them as a group.

That would have been the smart thing.

Instead, I pressed on.

I’m not sure what I expected to happen, but some trace of flawed logic believed that an item breaking free from my nasal passage would not necessarily result in a total surrender to gravity.  I guess I thought–hoped–that whatever had emancipated itself would remain in place.

Before I knew it, I felt a string of cold, wet … gunk … hanging from my nostril.

Not dropping from my nostril–HANGING FROM MY NOSTRIL.

Fight or flight kicked in.

I could run out of the room, or I could take action.

I chose action.

Did I have time to grab a tissue?  That would mean that the detritus would remain in place as I traversed the span of the room.  No, that would not do.  The debris must be dealt with immediately.  I could not risk providing a picture opportunity.  This moment would not live on in social media infamy.

With a whip of the hand, a strategic swipe of the forefinger, the goo got wiped away.

It did not dissipate, nor did it fling to the floor.  No, it clung to my finger, still easily discernible to the observant eye.

Operating on pure instinct, I moved to the tissue box, yanked out a tissue, and swiped the miserable muck off my person before jettisoning it into the garbage.

And then … I faced the class.

Once again … fight or flight time.

Within a span of five seconds, I said the following …

“Oh, my gosh, I’m so sorry!”

“Well, that was gross.”

“It just fell out, out of nowhere!”

“Yuck, it was gray.  Probably gray matter.  My brains are falling out!”

“If I’m not here tomorrow, you’ll know why.”

“At least you’ve all got a story to tell now.”

“Let’s just move on and pretend this never happened.”

So, there you have it.  Is that the most embarrassing thing that’s ever happened to me in front of an entire class?  So far, probably.  Hey, I made it sixteen years teaching before something abruptly and uncontrollably left my body.  That’s a pretty good run, right?

Man.

I hope that’s as bad at it gets.

 

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(Did you enjoy this article?  Check out Scott William Foley’s latest book HERE!)

The Edutainer

There’s a term that has come into vogue lately that I find a little troubling–“The Edutainer.”

If you’re unfamiliar with this word, it’s combining “educator” with “entertainer.”  The idea is that a teacher performs daily for their classes in such a way that the students are entertained.

Not just engaged, but actually entertained as though they were watching a show.

Yes, on the surface that sounds wonderful, but I think most of us realize that there are very few people from any walk of life who can perform daily for eight hours a day in such a way that children/teenagers are both learning and laughing nonstop.

Furthermore, I think it’s very unfair to make teachers feel as though they are somehow less effective if they are not constantly entertaining their students.

I’ve been teaching long enough to know that certain “buzzwords” come and go.  Usually these buzzwords are developed by a person or company looking to make a buck.  I’ve heard of professional development, workshops, and even college courses pushing “edutainment.”

Now, if we’re being honest, I’ve been told that I’m an “edutainer.”  I’ve never quite figured out if that’s meant as a compliment or an accusation, by the way.  However, I know myself well enough to realize that my “edutainment” is just part of my personality.  When I’m in front of a group of kids, I get silly.  I can’t help it.  I like to keep things light.  I like to joke around.  I like to make people smile.

This is fine for me, but I would never dream of forcing other people to adopt this methodology if it’s not part of their personality.  At the end of the day, teachers must teach in a manner that makes them comfortable.  Obviously, no matter what, lessons must be engaging, but to ask a teacher to put on a “show” is not really fair, especially if that’s not a component of their persona.  I’ve personally had some really funny teachers in my life, but I’ve also had very serious teachers as well.  I learned a great deal from both because–most importantly–they were effective teachers.  Let’s not lose sight of what were really trying to achieve.  First and foremost, our students should be learning.

It is worth noting, however, that teachers can still incorporate “edutainment” in their classroom even if they are not specifically the “edutainer.”  There are plenty of educational websites and learning programs that deliver fun, entertaining content to supplement a teacher’s lessons.  I would encourage teachers to look into those things because I also believe the days of asking students to listen to lecture while taking notes is over.  Our students are accustomed to bouncing from one thing to the next, and I would venture that the teachers operate like that in their personal lives as well.  There’s an old saying that teachers should switch up their activities during a lesson every fifteen minutes.  “Edutainment” programs would be one helpful way to achieve this.

At the end of the day, I would encourage teachers to accept who they are as people.  If a teacher is not an “edutainer,” that’s totally okay.  No teacher should ever feel less effective if they are not comfortable with a style that contradicts their persona.  As long as students are treated respectfully, with kindness, and provided consistently engaging lessons, I think the kids will be just fine.

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(Did you enjoy this article?  Check out Scott William Foley’s latest book HERE!)

Why It’s Hard To Write About Uncomfortable Things, and Why We Need To Do It Anyway

If you visit this website frequently, you realize that–other than my fiction–I tend to focus on fairly noncontroversial topics like movies, books, TV shows, and sports.  Sure, movie fans can get worked up, as can book lovers, but it’s not like anyone from my personal life is going to stop talking to me because of my take on Justice League.

My fiction is a different matter.  I’ve dealt with miscarriage, politics, religion, and everything else society tells us to avoid discussing, but I’ve done so with nuance and embedded within the lives of my characters.

On this blog, though, where anyone can pop in with minimal effort, I exercise quite a bit of self-restraint.

Do I have opinions about Donald Trump?  Of course.  Do I think about the NFL and its flag controversy?  Absolutely.  Do I firmly believe we have severe problems in our great nation regarding class and race?  Definitely.  But I tend to avoid writing about those things because, well, I don’t want to deal with the fallout.

I will often talk myself out of addressing those topics because I fear professional complications, personal ramifications, or even violent repercussions against my family.  Frankly, it’s easier to say nothing–to avoid making waves.

But here’s the thing–I can avoid making waves.  The fact that I have every advantage in the world is not lost upon me.  I can sit back, keep my mouth shut, and keep living a pretty sweet life.  No one is bothering me.  No one is oppressing me.  No one is attacking me.  No one is threatening me.  I can stay the course and be just fine because of my lot in life.

Is that right?

I don’t think it is.

Some would disagree, but I feel that I’ve been given a gift in that I can express myself through the written word.  My ideas flow through my fingers fairly concisely and articulately.  I am able to write about important issues whereas others can’t.

But I often choose not to.

Is that right?  If I believe in something, and if the expression of my beliefs could have positive implications for others, am I under a moral obligation to voice those thoughts?

I think I am.

Going forward, I’m going to strive to write about topics that I deem important regarding politics, social justice, religion, and community.

It terrifies me to do so.

Which is why I know I should follow through with this endeavor.

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(Did you enjoy this article?  Check out Scott William Foley’s latest book HERE!)

Nobody Cares About Your Writing … Until They Do

“Why do you think you’re so important, anyway?  Seriously, how big of an ego must you have to believe people actually want to read your thoughts?  It’s not like you’re an expert, right?”

These are ruminations we all have when we try to write–myself included.  The truth is, this can feel like a futile, pointless endeavor at times, especially if you’re struggling to find a large audience.  I venture to guess that many of us have considered calling it quits–again, myself included.

So why do we keep writing?

That’s the real question, isn’t it?

I can only speak from my own perspective, but I believe many of you will share my outlook.  I keep writing for two very specific reasons.

The first reason is that I’m stubborn.  I like to write, damn it!  I enjoy this process!  Is it time-consuming?  Yes!  Frustrating?  Yes!  Hard!  You bet!  But, believe it or not, it brings me joy.  I like creating.  Watching words flow from my fingertips onto the page is a magical, thrilling experience.  Quit writing because I’ve yet to find a broad audience?  No way!  There’s no quitting, but there’s plenty of stubborn.

Secondly, I firmly believe I will one day catch on.  I’ve got a small, loyal following, and those wonderful people help to keep me on track.  It never fails–when I’m feeling down, I’ll notice a new, positive review, or I’ll have a kind remark sent to me via social media, on this website, or in an email.  If this small group of readers, whom I deeply respect as an intelligent audience, if they find something redeeming about my writing, then surely more people will, too.  I honestly believe that.

So, yeah, right now, relatively speaking, nobody cares about my writing.  But one day–one day–I’ll be an overnight success story.  Never mind this overnight success is currently on its thirteenth year.

Nobody cares about your writing … until they do.

And when they do, all that time, all that effort, all that heartache, all that passion–it will all be worth it.

So believe in yourself.

Keep writing.

Write your reviews, your songs, your opinion pieces, your fiction, your editorials, your poetry, your plays–write and never quit!

Because they will care about your writing.

It’s just a matter of time.

Believe in yourself, and they will soon believe in you, too.

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(Did you enjoy this article?  Check out Scott William Foley’s latest book HERE!)

Christopher Robin – A Movie Review

I’ll be honest, when I first saw the trailer to this movie, I felt totally turned off.  It struck me as dark, dreary, and unnecessarily … adult.  Well, I’m happy to tell you that I couldn’t have been more mistaken.

Though we aren’t particularly big Winnie the Pooh fans, we like him well enough.  Once I heard good buzz about Christopher Robin and secured assurances from friends that it was an appropriate family film, I couldn’t wait to take my own kids.

I’m so glad I did.  The story is about a grownup Christopher Robin.  It has a charming beginning in which Christopher says goodbye to Pooh and his friends before he must head off to boarding school.  At boarding school, he learns to be efficient, serious, and unimaginative.  Once out of school, he has falls in love, goes to war, has a child, and now works in management for a luggage company.

Christopher Robin is an absolute bore.  He has forgotten how to enjoy life, and in doing so is missing out on the joy of his own wife and child.  As you guessed, Pooh and friends reenter his life, and from that moment forward a charming story ensues.

I won’t lie–I adore this movie.  As an adult, it provided some potent reminders about what is truly important in life.  And though it may have brought a tear to my eye here and there, it never struck me as overtly self-righteous.  It did not sermonize, lecture, or beat me over the head with its message.  It simply told a story, a story that even my nine-year-old could correctly interpret.

My children loved it because it was actually quite fun, cute, and upbeat.  Yes, the beginning is a little dour, but it’s all uphill from there.  Best of all?  Pooh and friends looked totally real.  I honestly couldn’t tell what was a puppet, what was a person in a suit, what was a robot, and what was CGI.  These old stuffed animals looked every bit the part, and as they walked and talked, it appeared natural in every respect.

On a deeply personal note, my six-year-old about made me start bawling in front of everyone.  As Christopher’s daughter was asking why he won’t go on trips with them and spend time with them, my daughter leaned over and whispered to me that she’s glad I take her places and spend time with her.  Crikey!  I about lost it.

I absolutely recommend this for the whole family.  It would make for a great last outing before school starts back up.  It helps that Ewan McGregor is about as likable as they come, as is Hayley Atwell, the electric actress who plays his wife.  And Pooh’s lines are so funny.  He’s truly a genius in the guise of a silly old bear.

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(Did you enjoy this review?  Check out Scott William Foley’s latest book HERE!)

The Kingdom Is Magic: Family 2018 Disney World Vacation (Part 7)

Am I saving the best for last?  Yes, you bet I am!  I won’t lie–Magic Kingdom is our family favorite park at Walt Disney World.  I’d say it’s the only place that truly has something appealing for each member of my family.  Remember that, at the time, my daughters were 9 and 6.  I can’t wait to give you a full account of the rides, the attractions, and the restaurants that we experienced.  By the way, we met many, many characters while at Walt Disney World.  I plan to write a separate piece detailing our encounters with them, so be on the lookout for that.

Rides

At this point, you probably know that I am the only member of my immediate family that loves high-intensity rides.  My wife will have nothing to do with them, my 6 year old is too young (in my opinion), and my (then) 9 year old is just starting to enjoy a few.  Therefore, I won’t have much to say about some of the bigger rides.  All in due time, right?  I have no doubt that one day my kids will love these things as much as I do.  For now, though, I’m going to address the rides aimed at the younger kids.

Jungle Cruise: This is a slow moving river ride, though you’re actually on a track beneath the water.  Trust me, you’re in no  danger of going off course.  During this expedition, you’ll see lots of jungle animals as well as a few natives.  It’s exquisitely designed and very realistic, but it’s not thrilling as far as rides go.  Fun?  Definitely.  We got one little jump when going through a cave–some robotic snakes caught my kids off guard and they let out a whelp.  Your captain entertains you throughout the ride with some super lame jokes, which I happened to love.

Peter Pan’s Flight: In 2017 we had no trouble getting on this ride, but for some reason during our 2018 trip, we couldn’t get on this thing without a Fast Pass, even right before closing!  Its popularity soared between the two trips!  My oldest daughter loves this ride, but my younger daughter didn’t want to do it in 2018–she thought it was too intense after riding it in 2017.  You’ll jump into a cute little boat and then take off into the sky.  This is an indoor ride that has you suspended from an above track.  Most of the ride has you looking down at the city of London and then the world of Never Never Land.  Everything is built to scale to make you feel much higher than you actually are, but you are still fairly high up–too high for my youngest daughter’s tastes.  Be aware, though magical, this is a very short ride that’s over almost as soon as it begins.

Pirates Of the Caribbean: I rode this back in 2017, but during this 2018 trip I got my oldest daughter to join me!  She enjoyed it thoroughly, though not as much as Haunted Mansion (more on that soon).  I got a kick out of the fact that she first thought Captain Jack Sparrow was an actual actor.  (He does look pretty real, to be honest.)  Again,  like Jungle Cruise, this is slow moving and more entertaining than anything.  If you’ve never done it, you sit in a long, flat canoe that takes you through a Caribbean locale set during colonial times.  You’ll see tons of automated pirates, villagers, animals, and Captain Jack Sparrow–and all of whom are doing something funny.  The ride occurs at “night,” so the ride is fairly dark with only “torches” lighting the way, but again, this is not a scary ride at all.  It’s pretty funny throughout.  I personally think it’s a little overrated, but it’s certainly a classic at Magic Kingdom and worth experiencing.

The Many Adventures Of Winnie the Pooh: This is one of those rides where waiting in line is almost as fun as the ride itself.  … Almost.  There are lots of little activities for kids to do in line as they wait, but the ride itself is surprisingly fun.  You will sit in a honey pot/car and ride along a track through the world of Winnie the Pooh.  At one point you’ll enter a dream of Winnie’s, and that’s when things get really weird (but in a good way).  Though it’s a short ride, both of my kids really enjoyed it.  It’s got a few sharp turns that my oldest enjoyed, and my youngest liked seeing all of Winnie’s friends.  The ride is not especially well lit, but I wouldn’t say it’s dark, either.  My youngest never felt frightened, so I’d say it’s a good all-ages ride.

It’s a Small World: You’ve got to do this classic ride, right?  Though pretty tame by today’s standards, It’s a Small World still retains a charming quality that makes the ten minutes well worth your time.  During this slow indoor boat ride, you’ll experience rooms created to represent different parts of the world with little dolls serving as representatives of that specific locale.  I personally enjoy the ending of the ride and its unifying message that my oldest daughter easily discerned.  Bright, cheery, and cute, It’s a Small World is a can’t-miss for the little ones.

Buzz Lightyear’s Space Ranger Spin: We didn’t really know what to expect with this, but we all had a blast!  During this slow moving ride, you sit in a “ship” with two lasers affixed to the dash.  At that point, you move through Emperor Zurg’s lair and blast away at anything with a target sign on it.  Your gun keeps a tally of hits, so you get to watch your score rocket up.  The carriage has a joystick in it as well that allows you to spin around.  This is handy for any targets you may want a second shot at.  All in all, we had a great time with this.  It was easy enough for my 6 year old to enjoy, but challenging enough for my 9 year old to take pride in her score.

Under the Sea–Journey Of the Little Mermaid: Though similar to The Many Adventures Of Winnie the Pooh in several ways, this ride has its own special quality.  You’ll sit in a shell as you slowly follow a track through Ariel’s domain.  Because you are under the sea, this ride is not especially well lit, but many of the characters are brightly illuminated so I wouldn’t describe it as “dark.”  My youngest got a little nervous when Ursula appeared at the end because the meanie is pretty big and very close to the shell.  However, she wanted to do the ride several times, so Ursula wasn’t enough to keep her away.  With your favorite music from the film and all of the fun characters, this ride was a hit with the entire family.

The Haunted Mansion: My youngest daughter would have no part of this, but my elder daughter decided to go for it.  She was very nervous in the beginning, but by the time it was over she absolutely loved it.  As you enter the ride, you’ll stand in a room with a large group of people.  Soon enough, the room gives the illusion of slowly descending.  Be sure to look at the pictures on the walls as you drop–there’s some funny stuff happening.  Once you finish your descent, a door appears and then you get into a buggy to ride throughout the house.  This is a very dark ride, but the mood is pretty humorous.  It could be intense for little ones who don’t pick up on the jokes.  When taken at face value, the holographic ghosts, tomb stones, and coffins could be considered scary.  My daughter heard the funny narration and noticed the gags, though, so she realized it was meant to be more of a thrill than a fright.  She loved it so much, we were sure to hop on a few times during our stay.

Attractions

Tom Sawyer Island: Though we didn’t visit this little island found in Frontierland in 2018, we gave it a try in 2017 and found it charming.  It’s exactly what it sounds like–a replica of Tom Sawyer’s backwoods turf.  You’ll follow paths, find small caves, cross a few hair-raising bridges, and eventually even stumble upon an actual military fort.  Be warned, though, you can only get across and back by using a small ferry.  As you’re on this little island, it’s easy to forget you’re at Magic Kingdom.  It’s a transitional experience.  We particularly found it appealing because it wasn’t nearly as busy as the mainland.  The kids had room to hike, explore, and bounce around.

Prince Charming Regal Carousel: I lost count of how many times my daughters rode on this carousel–they obviously loved it!  This huge carousel is pretty much right at the center of the kingdom, and though there is always a line, it moves fairly quickly because there are almost 100 creatures to ride upon.  You may remember that we like to close out parks, so once it gets near closing time, you can jump on this carousel pretty much at will.

Enchanted Tales With Belle: If you have a fan of Beauty and the Beast in your family, this is a must.  First of all, you enter an amazing room belonging to Maurice with so many fun, fun details.  You next enter a big room with the talking wardrobe.  At that point, she will ask for child volunteers to play roles in a reenactment of the famous story.  Trust me when I tell you that there is literally a part for every child in the room.  Next, you are ushered into Belle’s library.  The adults sit on benches and the children wait along the walls ready to rush in when appropriate.  Belle herself soon enters, and I guarantee you will hear a collective gasp when she does so.  The kids are absolutely mesmerized by her.  We were fortunate in 2017 that my oldest daughter got to play the lead role opposite Belle–we were amazed!  Best of all, every child in the room gets a photo opportunity at the end with Belle , and then the princess will personally give the child a small gift.  Like I said, if you’re a fan of Beauty and the Best, you can’t go wrong with this attraction.

Liberty Belle Riverboat: Though this is a steamboat replica in almost every respect, it clearly follows a track under the water.  It’s especially fun because the 20 minute ride is narrated by Mark Twain himself!  The ride takes you along a vast river which sometimes allows you a good view of the park.  It also takes you through the wilderness, though, and at that point you’ll see the life of frontiersmen and indigenous wild.  We did this ride in 2017 but passed on it during our 2018 trip.  I definitely think it’s worth enjoying at least once.  With three levels for passengers to sit, it wasn’t crowded at all and my daughters got to stand at the front of the boat exactly where they wanted.

Monsters, Inc. Laugh Floor: If you need a break from the heat, this will be an entertaining 10 or 15 minutes.  While seated in a theater, Mike Wazowski informs you that they’ve figured out how to use laughter to fuel their batteries rather than screams.  At that point, his fellow monsters come out–digitally on screen–and try to make you giggle.  The jokes are corny but fun, and they even get the audience in on the act.

Mickey’s Philharmagic: Right next to the carousel, Mickey’s Philharmagic is another attraction that my daughters simply couldn’t enjoy enough.  I have no idea how many times we saw this show between our 2017 and 2018 trips, but it was a lot.  You’ll sit in what looks like a classic theater while wearing 3-D glasses.  Once the show starts, your kids will be mesmerized.  Donald Duck basically loses Mickey’s magical hat right before a symphony begins and must travel through the worlds of Aladdin, The Little Mermaid, The Lion King, and more while trying to recover it.  Each world presents a famous song from the movie with astounding 3-D effects.  I caught both of my kids on several occasions reaching out for items that they thought were stretching from the screen toward them.  It’s also really fun because the back of the seat in front of you will blow out puffs of air in coordination with what is happening on screen, as well as a few other surprises that I’m not going to spoil for you.  Be sure to look behind you and up at the end of the show, by the way.  You’ll see a sight that delighted my kids every time.

Happily Ever After: This is the famous Magic Kingdom fireworks display.  Amazingly, they also shine a digitally projected show onto Cinderella’s castle.  These fireworks have ruined me–I can never view a 4th of July show again without muttering, “Can’t compare to Disney.”  The show on the castle is fantastic, the fireworks are gargantuan, and you even have a special treat at the very end in the form of everyone’s favorite fairy flying from the top of the castle across the park.  I wouldn’t want to be that performer!  Be aware, everyone wants to see this show.  You will be standing shoulder to shoulder no matter where you are in the park, and you will have to be assertive in maintaining your space.  Also, when the fireworks end, there is a mass exodus out of the park.  If you can stay for Magic Hours, make your way to the perimeter of the park and enjoy whatever rides are available until the masses have departed.

Restaurants

Be Our Guest: This was an impressive locale made to look like the Beast’s castle from Beauty and the Beast.  We ate in the main ballroom, which, frankly, looked exactly like it did in the cartoon.  Amazing detail!  We were seated next to a window with fake snow falling through the night sky outside.  Dessert was delicious, the gray stuff in particular, but the food struck me as fairly mediocre, especially at the extravagant prices.  You’re not here for the food, though, are you?  This place is all about the ambiance.  I would like to say that the servers were especially nice here, and that’s saying something considering that all cast members in the park are incredibly helpful.  Be aware that you can eat here as a Quick Service lunch and save a Table Service dinner if you’re on the meal plan.

Cinderella’s Royal Table: Truthfully, I think this was the worst meal I had during our entire stay.  I got ribs in our hotel’s cafe that blew this place away.  Anyway, although the food was terrible, everything else about this restaurant was super cool.  The kids met Cinderella immediately upon entering and then we climbed a spiral staircase to the top of the tower and sat in a wonderfully designed banquet hall.  Each of my daughters received a wand with a star affixed to the top of it.  We also enjoyed meeting several princesses as we ate including Jasmine, Snow White, Ariel, and Aurora.  They were all very kind and gracious, as one would expect.  The wait staff, though, left a little to be desired.  With the gratuity built in to a bill that would buy us a week’s worth of groceries, our waiter didn’t put forth much effort.  We rarely saw him and he didn’t strike us as particularly friendly or helpful.  Keep in mind, by the way, that if you’re on a meal plan, this will count as two Table Services.  As an adult, I felt the whole experience was a bit of a scam, but my kids loved it completely.  I mean, you can’t beat eating at the top of Cinderella’s castle, right?

1900 Park Fare:  Located in the Grand Floridan, this buffet specializes in breakfast and dinner.  We ate late in the afternoon, and so we got to enjoy Cinderella yet again with all of her supporting cast.  I think my oldest might have experienced love at first sight when Prince Charming made his way to us almost immediately after we were seated.  We also met Cinderella’s evil step-mother who honestly intimidated the hell out of me, as well as her two mean step-sisters.  They blow through quickly, though, so have your autograph books at the ready!  Don’t get me wrong, they spend several minutes at each table, but once they move on they likely won’t be back.  Our waiter was pretty good, and when he found out that we didn’t have our autograph books ready, he took the books “backstage” and had the characters “sign” them.  I’m under no illusions that the actual characters signed them, but at least he had different handwriting for each signature.  Everything about the Grand Floridian is ornate, and this restaurant is no exception.  And though it’s a buffet, it proved to be my second favorite meal.  My only complaint is that they sat us in a corner and we were packed in so tightly that we all had to get up to make room if even one of us wanted to go back to the buffet.  Like the above restaurants, this is a place you need to reserve way ahead of time–we’re talking weeks if not months.

Thanks so much for reading.  If you have any questions, please feel free to ask in the comments.  I’m soon going to write about meeting dozens of characters and I’m also going to dedicate an article to the “magical” moments we enjoyed while visiting Walt Disney World.  See you soon!

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(Did you enjoy this article?  Check out Scott William Foley’s latest book HERE!)