Ready For Football? Check Out This Short Story – “Why We Won”

I love football, and I love to write short stories.  Why not blend the two?  A while back, I did just that.  Now that football season is upon us, I’d like to remind you that “Why We Won” is available for download to your Kindle for ninety-nine cents.

Though very short, I’ve been told that it punches the reader in the gut by story’s end.

Here’s what it’s about: After five years of winning football state championships, a quarterback laces up for his last game. He and his team are brothers, and they know how much rides on each and every game. For them, winning is very much a matter of life or death.

Read it now by clicking HERE.

Now Is The Time To Join Dr. Nekros

Back in 2011, I started publishing the eighteen episode odyssey of Dr. Nekros.  It’s hard to believe there are now only two episodes left in the (mostly) bi-monthly electronic serial.  The next installment will release in late June, and the final one will arrive in late July.

Years ago I promised love, betrayal, monsters, reunions, ghosts, trickery, revenge, death, black magic, and battles … but I wasn’t too sure about salvation.  Unfortunately for Dr. Nekros, I’m still not decided on that matter.

This has been an electrifying journey, and I invite you to join me  now before it concludes.  Where better to start than the beginning?

 

Dr. Nekros - the story so far.  Only two episodes left!

Dr. Nekros – the story so far. Only two episodes left!

Now Available – Dr. Nekros: A Catastrophic Convergence (Volume III, Episode IV)

The story continues, but the end nears.  There are only two episodes left after this to conclude the eighteen part serial, so I hope you’ll jump on board now!

Dr. Nekros: A Catastrophic Convergence (Volume III, Episode IV) – Determined to get her youngest son back, Zetta seeks to invade Della’s lair with the help of Anton and Lillian. Meanwhile, Dr. Nekros has yet another new ally willing to take the fight straight to Xaphan in order to return Matty to his mother. Though separated by the realms of reality, both Dr. Nekros and Zetta strive for the same thing, and both will be horrified by story’s end.

To read your copy on Kindle for only $00.99, click HERE!

Dr. Nekros: A Catastrophic Convergence  (Episode IV, Volume III)

 

So I Published This Book … In 2010

2010 proved a busy year for me.  I returned to teaching after staying home with our first child for two years.  I started my Master’s in Reading degree.  We also built a house.

Oh, and I published a book.

Unfortunately, amidst all of those other things, I didn’t give the book’s release the attention it deserved.

Now, here we are, a blink of an eye and four years later.  I’m finishing my Master’s degree.  We’ve had a second child.  We are still settling into our house.

Oh, and I’m sort of promoting that book from 2010.

It’s about Andropia, the world’s last city, a utopia for its citizens known as Andropians. They exist to please the Maker, he who created them in his floating Citadel. Andropians cheerfully question nothing as they go about unnecessarily purifying air, cleaning water, and raising livestock. When Isaac arrives from the Citadel, his many questions lead other Andropians to compare him to the deviant Amelia. Soon Amelia and Isaac’s paths cross, and she persuades him to help rescue their people. For she long ago discovered a suspected harbinger of destruction, an object that could mean the end of life as they know it. Isaac and Amelia invade the Citadel and confront the Maker, but nothing could have prepared them for what they learn and their final fates.

Does Andropia sound good to you?  I have copies available for $9.99.  I’d love for you to read it so much, I’ll even handle the shipping costs (as long as you’re in the continental US).

One Amazon reviewer described Andropia as “… in some ways subversive, in many ways disturbing, and in all ways a thoroughly good read! “

Thanks for clicking HERE to get your copy through PayPal!

 

S. by J.J. Abrams and Doug Dorst – A Book Review

This is a book unlike anything else I have ever read.

There are two stories within this work.

One is surrealistic and focuses upon a freedom fighter known only as “S.”  He has amnesia, travels upon a mysterious ship full of anomalous sailors, and, through a series of events, battles an evil capitalist while yearning for a woman he does not know, but loves nonetheless.

The other story takes place within the margins of the first, and it is the written exchange in the form of annotations between a university student and an exiled graduate student.  The core of their dialogue occurs through written notes and centers upon the author of the above story, but, as fate would have it, their own lives seem in danger as a result of their investigation and this brings them together.  In order to understand their story, you must realize that they have different handwriting, identify their particular style, and comprehend that different colors of ink represent different time periods in their lives.  Because they apparently read and reread the book several times, you may see a note from them that was actually written near the end of their story.  Yes, it takes some getting used to.

The beautiful thing about this book, besides the notes in the margins, is that there are several artifacts within that correlate to the researchers’ conversations and research.  My favorite, for examples, is a map one of them drew upon a napkin.  There are also postcards, photographs, handwritten notes, even copies of newspaper articles.  In fact, the book itself is made to look like an old library book, complete with water stains and a checkout history.

The only negative thing I have to say is that I didn’t completely understand the stories of the book, which seems to necessitate another read on my part.  I chose to read each page and the margin notes all at once, and perhaps this was a misstep.  My reread will actually result in a third read, because I plan to read the story all the way through, and then go back and read the notes in the margins separately.  This should help distinguish the two tales from each other.  I jumped from one to the other on a page-by-page basis, and I believe this may have weakened my understanding of both.

That being said, S. is an important book because it challenges our notion of what constitutes a book.  In this digital age, print books must do more than they ever have before, and S. certainly seems to utilize a winning strategy.  By including multimedia artifacts that pertain to the book, the story becomes extremely interactive for the reader, making it all the more real.  Of course, the artifacts must seem genuine, which S. accomplishes, but I have to wonder if the average publisher could take on such an expensive venture.

In the end, I greatly enjoyed S., but I think I’ll enjoy it even more upon subsequent rereads.  There’s nothing wrong with revisiting a book, there’s no shame in needing to get closer to a book in order to fully understand it. There’s certainly nothing adverse about art demanding a little more, especially when it gives a little more.

 

Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell – A Book Review

Though aimed primarily at young adults, I can attest as a grizzled thirty-seven year old that I adored every single thing about it.

I don’t want to summarize the book for you, plenty of others have already done so, but I can tell you that though this story may not be new in terms of tone or theme, it is absolutely a page-turner.  Rowell delivers two wonderfully developed characters that will, by book’s end, occupy a space in your head and become a part of your existence.  Eleanor and Park will make you angry, they will make you laugh, they will make you giddy with delight, and they will destroy your heart, and you will love them for all of it.  In other words, they are very much like real people.

Beyond the well-rounded characters, Rowell successfully captured the essence of high school love.  She understands the rapture, the awkwardness, the rush, the torment—she understands it all and displays her understanding through Eleanor and Park.  Whether or not you experienced high school love, I know you will find something of yourself in both Eleanor and Park.

Furthermore, I believe by alternating points of view between Eleanor and Park, Rowell found a way to hasten the pace of the story, thus creating tension.  The emotional honesty, the characterization, and the writing execution is truly what makes this book shine.

And there is quite a bit of emotional honesty.  In fact, parts of this book read very autobiographical.  Frankly, I don’t care if Rowell based any of the book on her own life.  I hope not, of course, because Eleanor goes through a lot of very painful things, but I’d be a fool to think children don’t suffer through the things Eleanor does.  If Rowell used her own life as the basis for Eleanor’s, then I say more power to her.  If it all came from her own imagination, then I say her empathy is nearly superhuman and it will serve her well with future books—books I’m certain to read.

Though initially a quirky love story not unlike several other young adult novels, Eleanor & Park rocketed past them and entered a space all its own.  Funny, provoking, enlightening, and heart-breaking, Eleanor and Park invite you into their lives, and you will be both overjoyed and saddened to have visited.

No matter what your age or reading inclinations, I urge you to give this book a chance.

The Golem and the Jinni by Helene Wecker – A Book Review

I discovered this book through a positive review within the pages of Entertainment Weekly, and, I must admit, the premise really captured my imagination.  I’ve long found golems and genies fascinating, and the idea of making each a main character in a book set against late nineteenth century New York City, well, that’s a concept I can certainly support.  I found myself truly excited to read this book.

Wecker did not disappoint.  Not only is her idea a good one, but she is also a fine writer.  In fact, while I detest the confines of “genre,” some may find her style far more literary than expected.  She really strives to write beautiful sentences.  Furthermore, the vastness of her fertile imagination continually impressed me throughout the novel.  She does not restrict herself to New York City alone, her story also visits locales hundreds, even thousands, of years into the past throughout Europe and the Middle East.  Moreover, while I know nothing about the different communities within New York City from over one hundred years ago, she seems accurate with both her description and characterization.  It’s rather obvious she did her homework.

My only complaint is that the story went on a little too long.  I feel that about fifty pages could have been cut out, but that’s simply my opinion and many would certainly disagree.  With that being said, the last eighty or so pages move at a vigorous pace and I honestly could not put it down.  I’m especially glad that while it threatened to become a love story, it never fully dove into those waters.  It honestly had a touch of everything – horror, action, romance, fantasy, even humor.  In the end, though, it came to us through a literary lens, which is one of the things I most appreciated.

Wecker executes an intricate, well-woven plot that, ultimately, fits together seamlessly.  She clearly put a great deal of thought into this book and it is a credit to her that her writing style lived up to the richness of the plot.

For those seeking pure horror or overt swords and sorcery, I would look elsewhere.  But for those seeking a very well written tale driven by its characters with exquisite detail and ample using of magical realism, The Golem and the Jinni is for you.